The Grambling World-Famed vs. UAPB’s M4 at Grambling Homecoming

Bands, drumlines, Drummers, Drums, entertainment, events, Football, marching bands, music, Sports, videos

129 GSU Band131 Grambling Warm-Up133 Homecoming Crowd134 Grambling Homecoming135 Grambling Homecoming136 UAPB Band153 Grambling Cheerleaders165 Tailgating166 Tailgating167 Grambling Homecoming
One of the awesome things about Black college football is that the football battle on the field is matched by a battle between the two bands in the stands. This is especially true when the bands are two of the best in the Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC), such as Grambling’s World-Famed Marching Band and Pine Bluff’s Marching Musical Machine of the Mid-South. Not only did the bands battle back and forth during the course of the afternoon, but the various instrumental sections did as well, particularly Grambling’s Chocolate Thunder drumline and Pine Bluff’s K.R.A.N.K. drumline. The weather was beautiful as well, and Grambling’s much-improved football team had no trouble demolishing Pine Bluff, no small feat considering that last year’s Grambling team did not win a game.

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Tailgating at Grambling Homecoming

entertainment, events, Football, Sports

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On Grambling Homecoming weekend, the wooded area near Robinson Stadium is filled with tailgaters from all over the country. Some are just simple tents that have been set up with barbecue grills, while others are elaborate motor homes, and some large tailgate parties have DJ’s playing the latest soul, blues or occasionally rap. The smell of barbecuing meat drifts all over the area, even to the stadium.

Memphis Football: Whitehaven at Melrose in the Mound

Bands, entertainment, events, Football, marching bands, music, Sports, videos

437 Melrose Stadium438 Whitehaven at Melrose439 Whitehaven at Melrose441 Whitehaven at Melrose444 Whitehaven High School Band445 Whitehaven at Melrose448 Melrose High School Band450 Melrose High School451 Whitehaven at Melrose452 Melrose Cheerleaders455 Melrose High School Band456 Melrose High School Band457 Melrose High School Band458 Whitehaven at Melrose459 Whitehaven at Melrose460 Melrose High School Band461 Whitehaven High School Band462 Whitehaven High School Band464 Whitehaven High School Band465 Whitehaven High School Band468 Whitehaven at Melrose727 Melrose Tailgaters
Despite Memphis’ well-deserved basketball reputation, Memphis is also traditionally a strong football town, particularly at the prep level. People turn out to see both the ball game, and also the battle between the bands and drumlins as well, and certain stadiums are historic locations for Memphis Black high school football, such as Booker T. Washington Stadium in South Memphis or Melrose Stadium in the center of Orange Mound. On Friday, September 19, 2014, I went out to the latter stadium to see the game between Whitehaven High School and the Melrose High School Golden Wildcats. Both schools brought their marching bands to the game, which isn’t always the case in Memphis these days, but Melrose seems to have declined in numbers in recent years, and its band, though it sounded good, was far smaller than I remembered in the past. Whitehaven, on the other hand, is one of the city’s premier high schools, academically, athletically and musically. Its band marches more than 100 members, and looks and sounds better than many colleges. The football game was a runaway for Whitehaven, but the band battle was more evenly matched, although I would have to give Whitehaven the advantage there too. Both bands pleased the crowd by playing a number of current hits, including Memphian Snootie Wild’s “Yayo”.

A Stop The Violence Picnic at A. L. Davis Park Uptown

Basketball, Brass Bands, entertainment, events, Parks, Photography, Sports

806 STV807 Super Sunday808 STV809 Shakespeare Park810 STV812813 STV814 STV815 Shakespeare Park816 Shakespeare Park817 Shakespeare Park818 Shakespeare Park819 Shakespeare Park820 Shakespeare Park821 Shakespeare Park822 The Rainbow823 The Rainbow824 Central City825 Horace's Bar826 Bob827 Shakespeare Park Indian Mural828 Sidewalk Art829 Sidewalk Art830 Sidewalk Art831 Sidewalk Art832 Sidewalk Art
When I had first arrived in New Orleans on Wednesday night at Celebration Hall, there were rumors about a second-line being held on the following Sunday. Ultimately, they proved to not be true, but the second-line activist Big Red Cotton sent me a Facebook message that indicated that there would be a Stop The Violence Picnic uptown at A. L. Davis Park sponsored by the Kings of Kings Social Aid and Pleasure Club, and that brass bands would likely appear. So after breakfast, I headed out to A. L. Davis Park, formerly Shakespeare Park, which is the scene of the annual Uptown Super Sunday at which the Black Indian tribes appear. I found that there was a picnic going on, with basketball under the pavilion, youth football games in progress, and a DJ, but no brass bands, perhaps because there was also a heat emergency, and the temperature was near 100 degrees outside. Still, some little kids were having fun playing football and basketball, or watching the others, and the event called attention to the problems New Orleans has been having this summer with street violence.

Cutting Edge NOLA Keynote Speech and Dinner on the Lakefront

entertainment, events, Food, Hotels, music, Music Conferences, Photography, rap, Restaurant Reviews, Restaurants, soul, Sports

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When I got to the Intercontinental Hotel, the Cutting Edged NOLA Keynote Speech was going on, followed by a legal panel about sports and entertainment law. At the end of that, I headed out to the lakefront and ate dinner at Landry’s Seafood House. Even though Landry’s is a chain, it is the restaurant nearest to Lake Pontchartrain and has the best view of the lake, and the food was very good, at least on this particular day.

Soul in the Hole Basketball Tournament at Butler Park in the Old Fourth Ward @A3C @AEBLHoops @GrindHardED @DATPMF

Basketball, entertainment, events, Music Conferences, Sports


Sunday was the last day of A3C, and I was invited to a breakfast at the Melia Hotel with the conference staff. Afterwards, I drove over to the Old Fourth Ward neighborhood for the Soul in the Hole basketball tournament sponsored by the Atlanta Entertainment Basketball League. The AEBL runs a recreational basketball league for artists and performers in the Atlanta area, and A$AP Rocky was one of the artists who came out to participate. The tournament also gave us an opportunity to try something called Grind Hard Endurance Drink since they were a sponsor of the tournament, and the drink didn’t taste bad at all, particularly when chilled in a cooler full of ice on such a hot day. Since I wasn’t hooping, I can’t speak to the endurance part of it!

Jackson State Sonic Boom vs. Tennessee State Aristocrat of Bands at the #southernheritageclassic13

Bands, entertainment, events, music, Sports, videos


Although the annual Southern Heritage Classic in Memphis is a football game, Black college football classics are never JUST football games. It’s just as much about the pageantry and battling of the drumlines, bands and majorettes, the cameraderie and fun, good food and general good times. The Jackson State University Sonic Boom of the South is consistently one of the best marching bands in the Southwestern Athletic Conference, and Tennessee State’s Aristocrat of Bands is also well-known and well-regarded. In addition to the mandatory halftime show, bands from Black colleges often engage in an after-game ritual known as the “Fifth Quarter”, in which the two bands compete for crowd acclaim by playing tunes back and forth at each other after the game. Although this tradition has been somewhat restricted and shortened in recent years, it is still very much a part of the Black college football tradition.

Tailgating at Tiger Lane During the Southern Heritage Classic 2013

entertainment, events, Sports


Tiger Lane is named for the University of Memphis Tigers, but by an odd coincidence, the Southern Heritage Classic pits the Jackson State Tigers against the Tennessee State Tigers, so it’s appropriately named for the event. The gates open to tailgaters at 8 AM on game day, and the place becomes something like a small city, with tents, stages and recreational vehicles everywhere, and the sounds of music and the smells of barbecue drifting over the whole area. Many of the parties hire DJ’s for their day of fun, and every once in a while, a tent will have a live band. And although this year’s weather was hot, there were plenty of vendors with things like Italian ice or snow-cones to cool you off.

The Whitehaven Sounds of Perfection against the Central Sound of Midtown at Crump

Bands, entertainment, events, music, Sports, videos


Friday night I headed down to Melrose to see the Melrose and Kirby game, but I discovered when I got there that Kirby High School had not brought their band to the game, and since I had already seen Melrose this year, I headed on to Crump Stadium to see the Central/Whitehaven game. Both of these schools have relatively large bands this year, and both were in full battle mode all night. Central’s band is known as the Sound of Midtown, and is a young program that seems to be on the right track. Whitehaven, known as the Sounds of Perfection, is an incredibly-large high school band that could easily rival many colleges, and is one of the best high-school bands in the country. Unfortunately, perhaps because of the tense, close football game, there was no “fifth quarter” afterwards, with Whitehaven’s band leaving the stadium immediately after time had run out.