The Men of Class Second-Line with Da Truth Brass Band Uptown in New Orleans

brass band, events, music, second-lines

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On the Sunday after Grambling homecoming, I drove down from Monroe to New Orleans for a second-line sponsored by a social aid and pleasure club known as the Men of Class. The event was supposed to start from a bar on North Broad Street in Mid-City called the Chocolate Bar, directly across from the Orleans Parish Prison. Unfortunately, the event did not start on time, for a very bizarre reason. Although there was a crowd of fans and second-liners present, and the members of Da Truth Brass Band, nobody from the club that was to parade was present. By the time some of the club members arrived (about two hours late), the band did not seem to want to parade. Somehow, however, this was all worked out, and we began our journey across the overpass into Uptown. No sooner had we reached the other end than we were assaulted by a virtual blizzard of annoying little white insects of some sort. They were everywhere, and nearly everyone around me was involved in waving their hands and arms in front of their face to drive them away. We came to our first route stop on Louisiana Avenue two doors down from Big Man’s Lounge, and when we resumed the parade from there, Da Truth Brass Band broke out with the traditional brass band anthem “Why You Worried About Me.” Ultimately, the route was cut short due to the late start, but we had fun anyway.

Louisiana’s Young Roddy Performing at the @DuckDownMusic Bar-B-Que at @A3C @young_roddy

events, Hip Hop, music, Music Conferences, rap, videos

Young Roddy was not a name I was familiar with, but he was announced as being from Louisiana, and I was told that he was associated with the New Orleans rapper Curren$y. I thought his performance on Saturday afternoon was decent, and Roddy has recently released a new mixtape called Legal Dealing.

Keep up with Young Roddy:
https://twitter.com/young_roddy
http://www.jet-life.com/young-roddy.htm
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Young-Roddy/129521100440365
https://myspace.com/kidroddy

A Stop The Violence Picnic at A. L. Davis Park Uptown

Basketball, Brass Bands, entertainment, events, Parks, Photography, Sports

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When I had first arrived in New Orleans on Wednesday night at Celebration Hall, there were rumors about a second-line being held on the following Sunday. Ultimately, they proved to not be true, but the second-line activist Big Red Cotton sent me a Facebook message that indicated that there would be a Stop The Violence Picnic uptown at A. L. Davis Park sponsored by the Kings of Kings Social Aid and Pleasure Club, and that brass bands would likely appear. So after breakfast, I headed out to A. L. Davis Park, formerly Shakespeare Park, which is the scene of the annual Uptown Super Sunday at which the Black Indian tribes appear. I found that there was a picnic going on, with basketball under the pavilion, youth football games in progress, and a DJ, but no brass bands, perhaps because there was also a heat emergency, and the temperature was near 100 degrees outside. Still, some little kids were having fun playing football and basketball, or watching the others, and the event called attention to the problems New Orleans has been having this summer with street violence.

Breakfast on Banks Street

Breakfast, entertainment, Food, Restaurant Reviews

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Wanting to try something different for breakfast on a Sunday morning in New Orleans, I headed to a place called Wakin’ Bakin’ on Banks Street in a neighborhood called Mid City. This was a part of New Orleans that I had never seen before, and there actually proved to be several legendary breakfast spots in the area. In addition to the one I chose, there was also a placed called Biscuits and Buns on Banks, which had a line of people sitting outside waiting to get in, and a dive bar/music venue called the Banks Street Bar & Grill that apparently serves brunch on Sundays. There were also a couple of other kinds of restaurants for other meals of the day, such as the brightly-painted Mid City Pizza or The Crescent. Although it was hot, I chose to sit outside at a sidewalk table, since Wakin’ Bakin’ had quite a wait for an inside table. As is usually my choice, I opted for a bacon and cheese omelette, with breakfast potatoes and toast, and all was quite good. Prices are not particularly expensive either, so Wakin’ Bakin’ is a good go-to for breakfast in the Crescent City, although you should be aware that they are not open on Mondays.

Wakin’ Bakin’
4408 Banks Street
New Orleans, LA 70119
(504) 252-0343
http://wakinbakin.com

The TBC Brass Band Live at Le Maison Creole in Harvey, and the Zulu Club in New Orleans @TBCBand @TBC_BrassBand

Bands, Brass Bands, Concert Reviews, Concerts, Dance, entertainment, events, music, Travel, Uncategorized

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I had heard from friends in the TBC Brass Band that they were playing for some event at a place called Le Maison Creole in Harvey, a town on the West Bank, so when I left the Midsummer Mardi-Gras, I headed over there and caught up with them. I never could determine whether the event was a birthday party or a wedding reception, but the TBC band played for about 20 rousing minutes of second-lining and partying, and then headed back across the river to the Zulu Social Aid and Pleasure Club for another gig at a party. Although it was nearly midnight, there was a fairly large crowd along Broad Street in front of the Zulu Club, and I was really quite excited. The Zulu organization, although called a social aid and pleasure club, functions more as a Mardi Gras krewe, and now I was getting to witness a party there for the first time. The band members started playing on the sidewalk in front of the club, and then we all marched into the clubhouse, which was already quite crowded with people. Perhaps because of the late hour, the TBC played a shorter set than they had at Harvey, but the crowd seemed excited nonetheless.

Reggae on the Bayou?

music, musicology, Record Stores, records, Reggae

692 Wayne's World Reggae Shop
The Caribbean atmosphere of New Orleans has been pointed out many times, from the fact that the city celebrates Carnival, to the African-derived cultural practices of the Black Indian tribes and brass bands. But yet another point of Caribbean-Louisiana fusion is the unexpected prevalence of reggae music and culture in New Orleans. Young Black men often sport dreadlocks, reggae shops are found in many inner-city neighborhoods, reggae music is popular, and there is even a First Church of Rastafari in the 9th Ward. This shop on North Claiborne seems fairly typical, and wouldn’t look out of place in Montego Bay or Ocho Rios.

Cutting Edge NOLA’s Hip-Hop Showcase at @CafeIstanbul_ Sponsored by @ShiveMagazine @CuttingEdgeNOLA

Concert Reviews, Concerts, entertainment, events, Hip Hop, music, Night Clubs, rap, Record Labels, Record Stores

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After lunch, the Cutting Edge NOLA Music Business Conference held a rap and hip-hop summit at Cafe Istanbul in the St. Roch neighborhood sponsored by Shive Magazine. There were several preliminary presentations, including speeches by the owner of Shive Magazine, and by local rap CEO and activist Sess 4-5 of Nuthin But Fire Records, followed by a number of rap performances, including one by St. Louis-based hip-hop group the A-Team.

World-Renowned Fried Chicken at Willie Mae’s Scotch House in the Treme

Food, Restaurant Reviews, Restaurants, soul, Travel

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My morning panel at the Cutting Edge NOLA Music Business Conference was so early that I barely had time for breakfast, which I grabbed across the street from the conference hotel at John Besh’s Luke Tavern, which was good, if pricey. But after the panel, I decided to run out and see if I could grab lunch at the legendary Willie Mae’s Scotch House in Treme, a restaurant I had never gotten to try. I wasn’t at all sure I would get to. There are restaurants like Franklin’s Bar-B-Q in Austin that are just too crowded to get into, and Willie Mae’s has recently been featured on some Food Network TV shows. But I figured it couldn’t hurt to try, and after all, Willie Mae’s is known for one of my favorite dishes, fried chicken, and I wanted to see how it stacked up against the hometown favorite Gus’s in Memphis.
One thing that anyone visiting Willie Mae’s needs to know is that they do things a little differently than most restaurants. Though there is always a wait, there is not a waiting list as such. Instead, you stand outside under a tent, and people are seated as tables become available. Individual diners are encouraged to sit at the bar, and people are seated according to the number in their parties and what tables come open, not the order they first started waiting.
As for the menu, it is a typical soul food menu, but what almost everyone wants is the fried chicken, and with good reason. Like Gus’s in Memphis, it gets a pretty dark-brown coating, but Willie Mae’s seems a little less spicy than Gus’s, although there is a spice-laden finish that grows with Willie Mae’s over time. The crunchy coating encrusts pieces of white meat chicken that are juicy but not greasy at all, and for an up charge, one can get a breast and two wings. Although there are mashed potatoes and greens, I opted for the french fries instead, and they were basically good. The atmosphere, though crowded and bustling, is basically homey, and great soul music plays from overhead.
As for how it stacks up against Gus’s, I would have to call it an even tie, although there are subtle differences of course. As a lover of fried chicken, and both restaurants, I cannot proclaim either one the winner.

Willie Mae’s Scotch House
2401 St. Ann St
New Orleans, LA 70119
(504) 822-9503

Jamming With the Pinettes Brass Band at Bullet’s in the Seventh Ward

Bands, Brass Bands, Concert Reviews, Concerts, Dance, entertainment, events, Food, Funk, music, musicology, Night Clubs, Travel, videos

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After dinner, I drove over to the Seventh Ward, to a neighborhood sports bar called Bullet’s, where the all-girl Pinettes Brass Band has a weekly gig on Friday nights. The Pinettes won last year’s Red Bull Brass Band competition in New Orleans, and gets a lot of attention, as female brass band members are the exception rather than the rule. Bullet’s is the kind of neighborhood joint that you would miss if you weren’t looking for it, but I should have noticed the oil drum cooker out in front of it, which is a common site at New Orleans community bars. Inside was already packed, with an NFL preseason game on the big screen, but one by one the Pinette musicians arrived, and soon the club was rocking. The Pinettes are a decent brass band, with good arrangements, and a loyal following that soon filled the dance floor. While they played a lot of tunes unique to them, they also played some songs I recognized from the TBC, like “When Somebody Loves You Back” and Deniece Williams’ “Cause You Love Me Baby”, which I have never heard outside of New Orleans, but which is immensely popular there. After a brief intermission, the Pinettes played a rousing second set, and then everything wound to a close at midnight. By that point, cars filled the median on A. P. Tureaud.