An All-Star Memphis Turn-Out and Turn-Up for Frayser Boy’s New Album @FrayserBoy @Lil_Wyte @PhixieousEnt @Selectohits @Miscdaboss @DJBay

Albums, entertainment, events, Hip Hop, music, Night Clubs, rap, venues, videos

007 Purple Haze08 DJ Bay009 Suavo J010 Tune C011 Tune C012 Frayser Boy & Tune C013 Frayser Boy Party014 Tune C & DJ Zirk015 Frayser Boy Party016 Tune C & Miscellaneous017 Jason Da Hater & Tune C018 Frayser Boy Party019 Frayser Boy Party020 Eddie JookinJPG021 DJ Zirk & DJ Bay023 DJ Zirk & DJ Bay024 Miscellaneous025 Frayser Boy Party026 Snootie Wild027 Frayser Boy Party028 Snootie Wild029 Snootie Wild & Miscellaneous030 Snootie Wild & Miscellaneous031 Snootie Wild & Miscellaneous032 Frayser Boy033 DJ Zirk & Frayser Boy034 Frayser Boy & Lil Wyte035 DJ Zirk & Lil Wyte036 Frayser Boy037 Frayser Boy038 Frayser Boy039 Frayser Boy040 Frayser Boy & Lil Wyte041 Frayser Boy, Miscellaneous & Wyte042 Frayser Boy & Miscellaneous043 Frayser Boy045 Snootie Wild & Frayser Boy046 Frayser Boy & Lil Wyte047 Frayser Boy & Snootie Wild048 Frayser Boy & Lil Wyte050 Frayser Boy Party052 Tune C, Frost & Zirk
Wednesday night is not usually a big entertainment night in Memphis, but on October 29, many of Memphis’ best industry figures came together at Purple Haze downtown to celebrate the release of veteran rapper Frayser Boy’s new album Not No Moe on the Phixieous label. Frayser’s own DJ Bay was on the ones and twos, and Tune C, DJ Zirk, Miscellaneous,Carlos Sargent, DJ Care Bear, Lil Wyte, Snootie Wild, Jason Da Hater,Suavo J, Louis Goggins of the Memphis Flyer and Lawrence “Boo” Mitchell of the Recording Academy and Royal Studios were among the attendees. Frayser Boy, Lil Wyte and Miscellaneous performed a few songs from the album toward the end of the night, and the event was all love, fun and food.

Keep up with Frayser Boy:
https://twitter.com/frayserboy
https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/frayser-boy/id7179992
https://myspace.com/frayserboy
https://www.facebook.com/frayserboy
http://wytestore.com/cds-c-13/frayser-boy-not-no-moe-p-96.html
http://instagram.com/frayserbizzle

Keep up with Miscellaneous:
https://twitter.com/Miscdaboss
http://www.reverbnation.com/miscellaneous
https://www.facebook.com/MISC.MOB?fref=ts&ref=br_tf

Keep up with Lil Wyte:
http://wytestore.com
https://twitter.com/lil_wyte_
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcP_XXXGysCH13clHPqnVdA
http://instagram.com/lilwyte
https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/lil-wyte/id1889568
https://myspace.com/lilwyte
http://www.reverbnation.com/wytemusic

Keep up with Phixieous Entertainment:
https://twitter.com/PhixieousEnt
https://phixieous.com
http://instagram.com/phixieous

Keep up with DJ Bay:
http://djbaymusic.com
https://twitter.com/DJBay

Celebrating the Release of the B.A.R. Album with @Lil_Wyte_ and @FrayserBoy at @HardRockMemphis @selectohits

entertainment, events, music


On Saturday night February 8, an all-star contingent of Memphis rappers and fans took over the Hard Rock Cafe on Beale Street to celebrate the release of Lil Wyte & Frayser Boy’s new duo album B.A.R. on Phixieous Entertainment. Wes Phillips, Jeff Phillips and Terrance “DJ Bay” Long of Select-O-Hits were in the building, as well as La Chat, Miscellaneous, Criminal Manne, Al Kapone and Thug Therapy. Unlike a lot of album release parties, people actually performed, and coming as it did after a big University of Memphis Tigers win at the Fed Ex Forum, it was a fun night indeed.

Album Review: @SonnyBama Chronicles The Southern Struggle

Album Reviews, Albums, entertainment, events, music

SLAB7414
In the American mind, the South often brings up images of military struggle or racial struggle, but rarely that of class struggle. Yet, in his debut album The Long Way Home, Mobile, Alabama rapper Sonny Bama has become the voice for the South’s dispossessed working class, continuing the legacy of left-leaning Southern populists like Big Jim Folsom and Huey Long and invoking the culture of Alabama’s Gulf Coast. While the country/rap fusion has been around long enough to develop certain cliches of its own, Bama skillfully avoids most of them, and even on the most typical “country rap” track “The Bottom”, you can tell that he knows his folks and that he means every word. Other songs venture into soul and funk territory like the sad and mellow “Anyway” featuring Gregg Fells on vocals or the more-up-tempo “Ain’t No Use”. “On My Own”, which describes a battle with alcohol and features singer and guitarist Wes Bayliss is more of a country ballad, as is the pleading “Jonna Lee” featuring Memphis rap icon Lil Wyte, while the single “Let Go” featuring Nashville rapper Jelly Roll is rock, but the one thing that unifies most of the record is its stark and somber mood and its emphasis on change, whether political and economic, or a man’s promise of better days to his woman. Even the album’s main anthem of defiance “UnPhased” contains the lines “I’ve seen trouble all my days.” Aside from the descriptive “The Bottom”, the only other ray of sunshine occurs in the determined closer “Today”, which contains a self-affirming message. With The Long Way Home, Sonny Bama has reminded the world of the South’s other struggle, calling for change while at once expressing his pride at who he is and where he’s from, reclaiming what it means to be Southern from the usual assumptions and prejudices.