Tyke T Waking Memphis Up With The 4 Soul Band at River Arts Fest @Tyke_T

Art, Artists, Arts, Bands, Drum Solos, Drummers, drumming, Drums, entertainment, events, Hip Hop, music, rap, soul, videos

094 River Arts Fest095 Otis Logan097 4 Soul Band098 Otis Logan099 Otis Logan101 Tyke T & 4 Soul102 Tyke T & 4 Soul103 Tyke T & 4 Soul104 Tyke T & 4 Soul105 Otis Logan & Lloyd Anderson106 4 Soul Band107 Tyke T & 4 Soul108 4 Soul Band109 Tyke T & 4 Soul110 Tyke T & Otis Logan111 Tyke T112 Tyke T113 Tyke T114 Tyke T115 Tyke T116 Otis Logan & Lloyd Anderson117 Tyke T & 4 Soul118 4 Soul Band119 Tyke T & 4 Soul120 Tyke T & 4 Soul121 Tyke T & 4 Soul122 Tyke T & 4 Soul124 Tyke T & 4 Soul127 Tyke T & 4 Soul128 4 Soul Band129 Otis Logan130 Otis Logan & Lloyd Anderson131 Tyke T & 4 Soul132 Tyke T133 Tyke T & 4 Soul134 Tyke T & 4 Soul135 Tyke T & 4 Soul136 Tyke T & 4 Soul137 Tyke T & 4 Soul138 Tyke T & 4 Soul140 Lil Cam141 Lil Cam142 Lil Cam143 Tyke T & Lil Cam144 Tyke T & Lil Cam145 Tyke T & 4 Soul146 Tyke T & Lil Cam147 Tyke T & Lil Cam148 Tyke T & Lil Cam149 Tyke T & Lil Cam151 Otis Logan152 Lil Cam & Tyke T153 Lil Cam & Tyke T154 Tyke T & 4 Soul155 Lil Cam & Tyke T156 Tyke T & 4 Soul157 4 Soul158 S.O.U.L.160 4 Soul161 Tyke T162 Tyke T & 4 Soul163 4 Soul164 4 Soul Band
Tyke T was already an up-and-coming Memphis rapper when the local radio station K-97 proclaimed him the “Next Big Thing” after he won a contest they sponsored. Since then, he has been to New York and several other places for concerts, and although he might not be nationally known yet, he is part of a growing movement of Memphis rappers who seem to be more positive, more upbeat and more lyrical. He is also part of a growing local trend to rap with live musicians instead of just recorded tracks or a DJ, and for his performance at the River Arts Festival, he chose one of Memphis’ best up-and-coming bands, 4 Soul to back him, along with live singers, and guest appearances from other Memphis rappers such as Li’l Cam and S.O.U.L. Altogether it was a rap performance that could appeal even to people who don’t usually like rap, and that was probably precisely the point. Tyke’s lyrics avoid the negative tendency of the local artists that lean more to the gangsta style, and the live band gives him an appeal to those whose musical preferences lean toward other genres.

Keep up with Tyke T:
http://www.drivenbymusic.net
https://www.facebook.com/DrivenTykeT
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdzNtZzXLoK1e5ov0FLTqtQ
https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/tyke-t/id555051861
http://www.reverbnation.com/tyket
http://www.vevo.com/artist/tyke-t

http://www.twitter.com/Tyke_T

Keep up with 4 Soul:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/4Soul-Band/1377335069158206

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Bluesman Terry “Big T” Williams Performing at the River Arts Festival

Art, Blues, dunk, entertainment, events, Funk, music, soul

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For whatever reason, the music at this year’s River Arts Festival seemed oriented toward folk, rock and country, with far less jazz, blues, soul or gospel than previous years’ festivals. But one exception was Clarksdale-based bluesman Terry “Big T” Williams, who played all Saturday afternoon on the festival’s far northern end of Main Street, occasionally accompanied by Latin percussionist Rico Rumba as well. Big T’s repertoire stretches from traditional blues to soul tunes like Rufus Thomas’ “Walking the Dog.” Occasionally, groups of festival goers would stop to listen before heading further down to the art exhibits.

River Arts Festival Takes Over Memphis’ South Main Arts District

Art, Artists, entertainment, events, Food, music

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Each October, the River Arts Festival takes over Memphis’ South Main Arts District, the trendy neighborhood south of Beale Street and north of the Central Station train depot. Of course there are plenty of art works and crafts, but there is also a lot more, including three stages of live music, some strolling musicians, and plenty of food and drink.

Celebrating Street Art at the @Heineken Pyramid at @A3C @PaperFrank

Art, entertainment, events, Graffiti, Hip Hop, music, Music Conferences, rap

027 Heineken Pyramid034 Heineken Pyramid035 Heineken Pyramid036 Heineken Pyramid037 Paper Frank038 Paper Frank039 Tanner Wilson040 Heineken Pyramid054 DuckDown Bar-B-Que056 DuckDown Bar-B-Que074 DuckDown Bar-B-Que858 Heineken Pyramid075 DuckDown Bar-B-Que860 Heineken Pyramid861 Paper Frank091 A Drone Over A3C095 Heineken Pyramid096 Paper Frank097 Heineken Pyramid098 DuckDown Bar-B-Que100 Heineken Pyramid101 DuckDown Bar-B-Que102 DuckDown Bar-B-QueJPG
Over the last couple of years, much concern has been expressed about what some see as the growing commercialism of A3C as a festival, and there is no doubt that major national brands like Red Bull, Reeboks and Heineken have discovered the event, and that there are a lot more mainstream artists being programmed to appear. But all of the corporate involvement is not entirely negative. This year Heineken sponsored a pyramid at the festival area that was a template for a number of graffiti artists to create works of art during the days of the festival. Everyone involved created beautiful and interesting works, including Atlanta’s own Paper Frank, whose birthday party I had inadvertently stumbled into last fall in East Atlanta Village. Perhaps the interest in A3C on the part of larger brands won’t have a negative impact if the companies approach the culture with a degree of respect, as Heineken seemed to do this year.

Late Afternoon in the Midtown Arts District

Art, Artists, entertainment, music, Photography, Travel

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The neighborhood where the new Offbeat Arts gallery is located is called the Midtown Arts District, and is Jackson’s fastest-growing arts community. Unlike Fondren, where rents are soaring, Midtown still has affordable buildings, but it is rapidly becoming the hippest neighborhood of Mississippi’s capital. Although the emphasis is on the visual arts, there are a few places that involve music, including the Soul Wired Cafe, Offbeat and TurnUp Studios.

Snowballs and Street Art in New Orleans’ Central City

Art, Artists, Desserts, Food, Record Stores, Restaurant Reviews, Restaurants, Travel

619 The Red Rooster Snowball Stand620 Red Rooster Snowball Stand621 Rebuilding Our Community622 Verret's Bar & Lounge623 Verret's Bar & Lounge624 Zulu Nation Laws of Success625 Central City Art Project626 Central City Art Project628 Be The Change You Seek
As I headed back toward the CBD, I drove through the Central City area, and with the weather blazing hot, when I saw a snow-cone sign on Washington Avenue, I took a detour onto the side street and found a snowball stand called The Red Rooster. While New Orleans people are familiar with snowballs, I need to point out that New Orleans-style snowballs are quite different from the snow cones that are sold elsewhere across the country. Not only are the flavors different, but so is the ice, which at the better snowball stands is shaved. This particular stand also serves food, and has a shrimp po-boy on the menu that I will have to try on a future visit. The street where the stand is located looked familiar to me, and might have been the location where I visited Eddie’s 3-Way Records back in the 1980’s. I recall that it was on a side street off of Washington Avenue, that it was a block from a housing project (likely the Magnolia Projects), and that there was a snowball stand nearby that served po-boys. Further down in Central City, I came to a number of inspirational murals, which are common in New Orleans. One listed the Zulu Nation Laws of Success, as well as a number of famous men and women and was attributed to the Central City Art Project. Another one stated “Be The Change You Seek.” One of the things I love about New Orleans is the prevalence of public art, official and unofficial, even in the roughest neighborhoods.

Inspiration and Devastation in the Desire Neighborhood and the Lower 9th Ward

Art, Artists, Black History, Parks, Photography

487 Desire488 Desire489 Desire490 Do Not Underestimate Us491 We Do Exist492 Ya Heard Me493 Peace Love Respect494 We Are Greater Than Oppression495 Ancestors Watching496 Sampson Pride497 Peace Love Music498 Piety & Pleasure499 Rubarb Bike Shop500 Rubarb Bike Shop501 Rubarb Bike Shop502 Rubarb Bike Shop503 Rubarb Bike Shop504 Rubarb Bike Shop505 Rubarb Bike Shop506 Rubarb Bike Shop507 Rubarb Bike Shop508 Rubarb Bike Shop509 First Church of Rastafari511 9th Ward512 9th Ward513 No Selling Cat Etc514 Bless Da Mic-Katrina Second-Line515 9th Ward516 The Crew
After breakfast at the Who Dat Coffee Cafe, I was already in the general vicinity of the Lower 9th Ward, so I decided to drive around that area and see if there was anything worthy of being photographed, and actually there was a lot. Of course, the Lower 9th Ward had been devastated by the flooding of Hurricane Katrina. Cut off from the rest of New Orleans by the Industrial Canal, the neighborhood is surrounded by water on three sides, and for many years was the home of two notorious housing projects, the Florida Projects and the Desire Projects, the latter of which was once said to be the largest public housing project in America. Both projects were wrecked by Katrina, and neither were rebuilt, at least not as housing projects. Mixed income developments are being built on the site. Business areas in the northern portion of the neighborhood were also devastated, and since people have not returned in large numbers, none of these shopping centers have been rebuilt. They are still ruins, covered with gang graffiti. But nearby, at a playground called Sampson Park, I came upon a beautiful mural done by something called “Project Future for the Youth”, containing a lot of wonderful and inspiring slogans and quotes, presumably painted and conceived by young people from the neighborhood, possibly even before the storm. The various tiles within the mural call for peace and an end to violence, and emphasize brotherhood, peace and even music. One section of the mural states, poignantly, “I know they watching…Ancestors watching.” Perhaps nothing more accurately sums up the unique culture of New Orleans, particularly the city’s Black neighborhoods…traditions that have died out in many other cities last years longer in New Orleans, perhaps because the young people know they are being watched by those who have gone on before.
In another part of the neighborhood was an attractively colorful building which proved to be a bike shop. All kids love bikes, but bikes are not just for kids in New Orleans, which is a bike-friendly city in the extreme. Young people in inner-city neighborhoods even have customized bikes, sometimes rigged with lighting and sound systems.
Down on Claiborne Avenue, I came across a tire shop that has evidently had a problem with neighborhood crime, and decided to deal with it through a blunt sign: “No cat selling, No crack selling, No loitering…NOPD Will Be Called.” It’s hard to imagine anyone trying to sell drugs or love at the neighborhood tire shop, but evidently someone did. Nearby, a recently poured sidewalk gave a group of 9th Ward kids an opportunity to immortalize their names in concrete. They listed their names along with their ward, and the designation “The Crew”. Here’s hoping that they and their peers in the 9th Ward have a bright future ahead.

Farm-To-Table Steaks and More at Kermit’s Outlaw Kitchen In Tupelo

Art, Burgers, Food, Restaurant Reviews, Restaurants, Steaks, Travel

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Tupelo, Mississippi has always had a big-city ambiance that belies its relatively small size. It has a large regional mall, its own TV station, a zoo, a large convention center and arena and a fairly big downtown, complete with tall buildings. Now, Tupelo also has a big-city steakhouse called Kermit’s Outlaw Kitchen on Main Street downtown, opened by the same people who run the Neon Pig in North Tupelo. KOK is not just a great steakhouse with great food and an attractive ambiance, but it is also a burgeoning part of the locavore movement, a trend toward restaurants locally sourcing almost everything. A wood-burning pit downstairs fills the restaurant with an inviting aroma, and this is where steaks are grilled and shucks of corn are roasted. My expertly-cooked filet mignon was accompanied by fingerling potatoes, which were delicious, and I had substituted a husk of roasted corn (also amazing) for the vegetables. The large upstairs dining room is bright and cheerful, with local art works on the walls and plenty of windows, but there is also seating around a downstairs bar near the pit. Although I’m not a beer drinker, there is a decent selection of craft beers, many of them regional, for those who like that sort of thing. Altogether, I had a great meal and good fun at Kermit’s Outlaw Kitchen, and will certainly be back.

Kermit’s Outlaw Kitchen
124 W Main
Tupelo, MS 38804
(662) 620-6622
http://kermitsoutlawkitchen.com

Jazz and Neo-Soul at the New Dizzy Bird Lounge in Memphis

Art, Bands, Desserts, entertainment, events, jazz, music, Night Clubs, soul

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When Memphis’ African-American repertory company the Hattiloo Theatre moved to new digs in the Overton Square area earlier this year, many probably wondered what would become of their old location on Marshall Avenue, closer to downtown. Those questions were answered recently when a portion of the space became the Dizzy Bird Lounge, a place that states its intention to become a jazz club in Memphis, something that our city has badly needed since the closure of Cafe Soul a couple of years ago. The space is relatively small but comfortable, with a downstairs lounge decorated with African-American artwork, and a small upstairs loft with tables and chairs. Although the theme of the place is jazz (“Dizzy” refers to Dizzy Gillespie, and “Bird” to Charlie Parker), the music on stage the night I visited was a soulful singer-songwriter from Memphis named Barbara Jenice, who was performing with keyboardist Timothy Moore and a percussionist, as well as a couple of special guests who sat in. Closed on Mondays and Tuesdays, the Dizzy Bird intends to have spoken word or neo-soul type events on Wednesdays and Thursdays, and more mainstream jazz on weekends. They currently offer fruit and cupcakes, and are otherwise BYOB, at least for the time being.

The Dizzy Bird Lounge
652 Marshall Av
Memphis, TN 38103
http://thedizzybirdlounge.com

Exquisite Desserts at Nonnah’s in Columbia

Art, Artists, Coffee, Coffee Bars, Desserts, Food, Restaurant Reviews, Restaurants

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When I left out of Pearlz Oyster Bar, I was thinking of how nice it would be if Columbia had a dessert cafe that was open late at night. Looking across Gervais Street, I saw a small cafe with an outdoor sign that was flashing pictures of different kinds of desserts. It proved to be a place called Nonnah’s, which is actually a full-service restaurant in its own right, but the desserts are made in-house and truly amazing. Although they had coffee, with it being so hot, I chose a cold drink instead, and tried the Key Lime Pie, which was very unusual, but very good. Rather than the yellow-green custard type of pie that one usually sees with key Lime, this one was a light, airy whipped pie made from cool whip, sweetened condensed milk and lime juice in a homemade graham cracker crust. A number of other tempting desserts were visible in the glass case. Nonnah’s is open until 11 PM on weeknights, and until 12:30 AM on weekends.

Nonnah’s
923 Gervais Street
Columbia, SC 29201
(803) 779-9599
http://www.nonnahs.com